To what extent do local legal traditions related to the harmonization of arbitration law and practice around the world still influence local arbitration practice, especially at a time when non-Western countries are playing an increasingly important role in international trade and financial markets? How are the new economic powers reacting to the trend towards harmonisation? China offers a good case study, with its historical tradition of non-confrontational means of dispute resolution now facing current trends in transnational arbitration. Is China showing signs of adapting to the current trend of transnational arbitration? On the other hand, will Chinese legal culture influence the practice of arbitration in the rest of the world? To what extent do local legal traditions related to the harmonization of arbitration law and practice around the world still influence local arbitration practice, especially at a time when non-Western countries are playing an increasingly important role in international trade and financial markets? How are the new economic powers reacting to the trend towards harmonisation? China offers a good case study, with its historical tradition of non-confrontational means of dispute resolution now facing current trends in transnational arbitration. Is China showing signs of adapting to the current trend of transnational arbitration? On the other hand, will Chinese legal culture influence the practice of arbitration in the rest of the world? To answer these difficult questions, it is necessary to examine the development of arbitration in the context of China`s changing cultural and legal structures. Written for international businessmen, lawyers, academics and students, this book offers the reader a unique insight into the practice of arbitration in China, based on a combination of theoretical analyses and practical ideas. It explains contemporary arbitration in China from an interdisciplinary perspective and with a comparative approach, and places Chinese arbitration in its broader social context to facilitate understanding of its history, contemporary practice, legal barriers to modern arbitration, and possible future trends. In 2011, the thesis on which this book is based received the prize for the “Best Thesis in International Studies” by the Swiss Network for International Studies. What distinguishes this work from other books on international arbitration is its interdisciplinary perspective and comparative approach. This book makes a remarkable contribution to the understanding of arbitration in China and transnational arbitration in general. Academics, academics, and students of international arbitration, comparative studies, and globalization can all find this book challenging. It also provides useful advice to practitioners involved or interested in arbitration in China. Excerpt from Gabrielle Kaufmann-Kohler`s foreword To answer these difficult questions, it is necessary to examine the development of arbitration in the context of China`s changing cultural and legal structures. Written for international businessmen, lawyers, academics and students, this book offers the reader a unique insight into the practice of arbitration in China, based on a combination of theoretical analyses and practical ideas.

It explains contemporary arbitration in China from an interdisciplinary perspective and with a comparative approach, and places Chinese arbitration in its broader social context to facilitate understanding of its history, contemporary practice, legal barriers to modern arbitration, and possible future trends. China is now the second largest economy in the world and remains one of the fastest growing economies despite the global financial crisis. GDP growth averaged almost 10% in 2012. Most M&A deals now have a Chinese element. China is the second largest destination for foreign direct investment, and its currency, the renminbi, is becoming increasingly important as an international currency; it already accounts for about 13% of China`s trade. With one of the world`s largest sovereign wealth funds and a strategy to conserve more natural resources, China`s foreign direct investment is expanding China`s. Do you have conflicting interests? * Assistance with conflicts of interest. See all Google Scholar citations for this article. Enter your email address below and we will send you the reset instructions. Access to TDM Journal articles (more than 2500 articles in total for premium account holders) This website uses cookies to improve performance by remembering that you are logged in when you move from one page to another.

To allow access without cookies, the website must create a new session for each page you visit, which slows down the system to an unacceptable level. `); doc.close(); } } this.iframeload = function () { var iframe = document.getElementById(iframeId); iframe.style.display = “; setTimeout(function () { setIframeHeight(initialResizeCallback); }, 20); } function getDocHeight(doc) { var contentDiv = doc.getElementById(« iframeContent »); var docHeight = 0; if(contentDiv){ docHeight = Math.max( contentDiv.scrollHeight, contentDiv.offsetHeight, contentDiv.clientHeight ); } return docHeight; } function setIframeHeight(resizeCallback) { var iframeDoc, iframe = document.getElementById(iframeId); iframeDoc = ((iframe.contentWindow && iframe.contentWindow.document) || iframe.contentDocument); if (iframeDoc) { var h = getDocHeight(iframeDoc); if (h && h != 0) { iframe.style.height = parseInt(h) + `px`; if(typeof resizeCallback == « function ») { resizeCallback(iframeId); } } else if (nTries Schlüsselwörter: Schiedsgerichtsbarkeit, Globalisierung, China, Streitbeilegung, Mediation, Med-Arb, Arb-Med, Tradition, Kultur, Soziologie.